Dr. Samantha Meltzer-Brody Talks Postpartum Depression, PPD ACT APP Helping Mothers

Postpartum depression (PPD) is one of the most common complications women experience after childbirth. It’s estimated that PPD affects 500,000 to 750,000 mothers in the US each year (around 10 to 20%). Symptoms can range from “significant functional impairment, depressed mood and/or loss of interest in her newborn, anxiety, and associated symptoms of depression such as loss of appetite, difficulty sleeping, lack of concentration, loss of energy and poor self-esteem. Suicide is the leading cause of maternal death following childbirth.” Thankfully there’s an app helping mothers currently living with postpartum depression called the PPD ACT app.

Dr. Samantha Meltzer-Brody is an Associate Professor, Associate Chair for Faculty Development and Director of the Perinatal Psychiatry Program at University of North Carolina (UNC) Center for Women’s Mood Disorders at UNC Chapel Hill. She helped developed the PPD ACT iOS app to aid research that might help in the development of innovative treatment options. The app is now available to iOS and Android users.

PPD Act app. Postpartum Depression: Action towards Causes and Treatments.

PPD Act app. Postpartum Depression: Action towards Causes and Treatments.

pact app postpartum depression data collection

With PPD ACT, women have the opportunity to:

–       Take a 10-question validated, clinically screened survey to evaluate risk for PPD

–       Receive responses on whether she is (or was) suffering from mild to severe symptoms of PPD

–       Obtain resources for those struggling with PPD

–       Participate in study by providing a saliva sample using a “spit kit” (provided through the mail to U.S. participants by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) **only applicable to some women, based on score

–       Provide DNA samples so that researchers can study the genes of those impacted by PPD

Dr. Samantha Meltzer-Brody was kind enough to join me for an interview recently to discuss what postpartum depression is, the PPD Act app and how it works, and why the app is so important to women across the country currently living with postpartum depression. Please be sure to listen to the interview below to hear about this important app. For even more information please visit: http://pactforthecure.com/.

Please be sure to listen to my interview with Dr. Samantha Meltzer-Brody in its entirety to hear more about postpartum depression, and this amazing app that’s helping women.

 

 

 

ABOUT PPD

PPD is a common disorder impacting women after childbirth. PPD may have devastating consequences for a woman and for her family, which may include significant functional impairment, depressed mood and/or loss of interest in her newborn, anxiety, and associated symptoms of depression such as loss of appetite, difficulty sleeping, lack of concentration, loss of energy and poor self-esteem. Suicide is the leading cause of maternal death following childbirth. It is estimated that PPD affects 500,000 to 750,000 mothers in the US each year. A subset of these are severe enough to require hospitalization.  There are currently no FDA-approved treatments for PPD.

 

MORE ABOUT SAMANTHA MELTZER-BRODY, M.D., M.P.H:

Dr. Meltzer-Brody is an Associate Professor, Associate Chair for Faculty Development and Director of the Perinatal Psychiatry Program at University of North Carolina (UNC) Center for Women’s Mood Disorders at UNC Chapel Hill. She is specifically focused on Perinatal Depression and receives funding from multiple NIH grants for the purpose of investigating epidemiologic, genetic and other biomarker models of PPD. In addition to her research in PPD, she studies maternal depression in high-risk groups, such as adolescent mothers and mothers of children with neurodevelopmental delays. She also serves as the mental health consultant for the North Carolina Women’s Health Report Card. Dr. Meltzer-Brody is the founder of Taking Care of Our Own Program, a resource for UNC Health Care employees that promotes physician wellness to prevent exhaustion and physician burnout. She was recently recognized by The Triangle Medical Journal as one of the “Top 10 Women in Medicine.”

 

 

 

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