Gynecologist Russell Stankiewicz, MD Talks Sporadic Breast Cancer, BREVAGen Breast Cancer Q-Tip Test

One in eight women will develop breast cancer in her lifetime, and according to renowned obstetrician-gynecologist, Russell Stankiewicz, MD (Clinical Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology in The department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Family Medicine at The Commonwealth Medical College in Scranton, PA.) sporadic breast cancer is the most common breast cancer and accounts for 85% of all breast cancers.

Dr. Russell Stankiewicz, MD was kind enough to join me for an interview yesterday to discuss sporadic breast cancer, who is at risk for the disease, and how a revolutionary new BREVAGenplus Q-tip test can save lives.

 

Obstetrician-gynecologist Dr. Russell Stankiewicz, MD joined Candace Rose on Monday, October 5th for an interview to discuss sporadic breast cancer, and how BREVAGenplus Q-tip test is saving lives.

Obstetrician-gynecologist Dr. Russell Stankiewicz, MD joined Candace Rose on Monday, October 5th for an interview to discuss sporadic breast cancer, and how BREVAGenplus Q-tip test is saving lives.

 
    Candace Rose: Can you tell us about BREVAGen? Who is the perfect candidate?

Russell Stankiewicz, MD: “Well, BREVAGenPlus is the opportunity for us to screen women between the ages of 35 and 65 for sporadic breast cancer which is the most common breast cancer. It’s 85% of the breast cancers. These are women that maybe started their menstrual cycles at an earlier age, say before age 12. They’re maybe women that had their first child beyond age 30. They have had a breast biopsy. They may have had a distant family member that had breast cancer. That’s the ideal type of patient that we’d like to screen as far as BREVAGenplus is concerned.”

Candace Rose: One in eight women will develop breast cancer. Who is most at risk for developing the disease?

Russell Stankiewicz, MD: “Well, if you look at the two different types of breast cancer – you have the hereditary type of cancer, and that’s the type of cancer that we see that Angelina Jolie has had and she’s been very good about going out and promoting that across the country. She’s taken a very personal issue and made it very public. Those are the types of cancer that are passed from mother to daughter, so that’s a relatively small portion of the population – about one to two percent percent which equates to about 15% of those women that are diagnosed with breast cancer.

The 85% of women that have sporadic breast cancers are the ones we talked about, the ones that started menses early or had children late. Those are caucasian women, African American women, hispanic women between the ages of 35 and 65 that we like to screen and provide them with that individualized breast health plan.”

Candace Rose: Are there any differences between hereditary breast cancer and sporadic breast cancer?

Russell Stankiewicz, MD: “Well, the hereditary breast cancer is what we refer to as a high penetrance gene. In other words, if they come up positive for the BRCA1 or the BRCA2 gene, well then that absolutely has to be dealt with and has to be diagnosed and treated. Sometimes it comes with mammography, it can lead to mastectomy, it can lead to medication or chemotherapy, but that’s the hereditary type cancer.

The sporadic cancers are the ones that we take the opportunity to  identify those that are maybe low risk, intermediate risk or high risk. If they’re at low risk, those are the patients that we encourage them to do their monthly self exam, come in for their annual clinical exam, and if they’re the appropriate age, they should have their annual mammogram. 

The ones that are intermediate or high risk, then we sit down and we make a personalized plan. They may be patients that not only beyond mammograms, we may offer them an MRI or a full breast ultrasound or if they’re candidates, we may offer them medication to prevent breast cancer going forward.”

Candace Rose: How valuable is this test for women and physicians?

Russell Stankiewicz, MD: “I think it’s really valuable because it allows us to be proactive and it allows women to go ahead and take responsibility for their breast health. In conjunction with their health care provider they can make that personal individualized plan going forward as far as their risk for developing breast cancer but more particularly if they need advanced screening technologies such as MRI or ultrasound or medication to prevent breast cancer.”

Candace Rose: Do you have any additional information you’d like to share with us?

Russell Stankiewicz, MD: “Well, I think if patients would like to learn about this testing they can go to the website, it’s www.BREVAGenplus.com. It will explain the testing. It’s fairly simple, we take a Q-tip, rub it on the inside of their cheek and get a sample of DNA. Then it’s sent out. It’ll provide them with information concerning providers in their area that provide the testing, but more importantly the post counseling that comes after the test so they can make the plan going forward.”

Candace Rose: Will they get the results right away or does it take a while?

Russell Stankiewicz, MD: “It takes about two to three weeks for it to be processed and to be returned and then they can take the opportunity to sit down with their doctor or their health care provider and go through the results.”

Candace Rose: Where can they go for more information?

Russell Stankiewicz, MD: “They can go to BREVAGenPlus.com.”

Russell Stankiewicz, MD is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology in The department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Family Medicine at The Commonwealth Medical College in Scranton, PA. He is also President and Senior partner at OB/GYN Associates of Lewisburg, P.C. Dr. Stankiewicz is board certified in Obstetrics and Gynecology, has advanced certification in Minimally Invasive Surgery, and is a certified Menopause Practitioner. He sits on multiple committees of The North American menopause Society. He is also an FAA designated Aviation Medical Examiner.

 

Candace Rose: Can you tell us about BREVAGen? Who is the perfect candidate?  

Russell Stankiewicz, MD: “Well, BREVAGenPlus is the opportunity for us to screen women between the ages of 35 and 65 for sporadic breast cancer which is the most common breast cancer. It’s 85% of the breast cancers. These are women that maybe started their menstrual cycles at an earlier age, say before age 12. They’re maybe women that had their first child beyond age 30. They have had a breast biopsy. They may have had a distant family member that had breast cancer. That’s the ideal type of patient that we’d like to screen as far as BREVAGenplus is concerned.”

 

Candace Rose: One in eight women will develop breast cancer. Who is most at risk for developing the disease?  

Russell Stankiewicz, MD: “Well, if you look at the two different types of breast cancer – you have the hereditary type of cancer, and that’s the type of cancer that we see that Angelina Jolie has had and she’s been very good about going out and promoting that across the country. She’s taken a very personal issue and made it very public. Those are the types of cancer that are passed from mother to daughter, so that’s a relatively small portion of the population – about one to two percent percent which equates to about 15% of those women that are diagnosed with breast cancer.

The 85% of women that have sporadic breast cancers are the ones we talked about, the ones that started menses early or had children late. Those are caucasian women, African American women, hispanic women between the ages of 35 and 65 that we like to screen and provide them with that individualized breast health plan.”

 

Candace Rose: Are there any differences between hereditary breast cancer and sporadic breast cancer?  

Russell Stankiewicz, MD: “Well, the hereditary breast cancer is what we refer to as a high penetrance gene. In other words, if they come up positive for the BRCA1 or the BRCA2 gene, well then that absolutely has to be dealt with and has to be diagnosed and treated. Sometimes it comes with mammography, it can lead to mastectomy, it can lead to medication or chemotherapy, but that’s the hereditary type cancer.

The sporadic cancers are the ones that we take the opportunity to  identify those that are maybe low risk, intermediate risk or high risk. If they’re at low risk, those are the patients that we encourage them to do their monthly self exam, come in for their annual clinical exam, and if they’re the appropriate age, they should have their annual mammogram.   The ones that are intermediate or high risk, then we sit down and we make a personalized plan. They may be patients that not only beyond mammograms, we may offer them an MRI or a full breast ultrasound or if they’re candidates, we may offer them medication to prevent breast cancer going forward.”

 

Candace Rose: How valuable is this test for women and physicians?

Russell Stankiewicz, MD: “I think it’s really valuable because it allows us to be proactive and it allows women to go ahead and take responsibility for their breast health. In conjunction with their health care provider they can make that personal individualized plan going forward as far as their risk for developing breast cancer but more particularly if they need advanced screening technologies such as MRI or ultrasound or medication to prevent breast cancer.”

 

Candace Rose: Do you have any additional information you’d like to share with us?  

Russell Stankiewicz, MD: “Well, I think if patients would like to learn about this testing they can go to the website, it’s www.BREVAGenplus.com. It will explain the testing. It’s fairly simple, we take a Q-tip, rub it on the inside of their cheek and get a sample of DNA. Then it’s sent out. It’ll provide them with information concerning providers in their area that provide the testing, but more importantly the post counseling that comes after the test so they can make the plan going forward.”

 

Candace Rose: Will they get the results right away or does it take a while?  

Russell Stankiewicz, MD: “It takes about two to three weeks for it to be processed and to be returned and then they can take the opportunity to sit down with their doctor or their health care provider and go through the results.”

 

Candace Rose: Where can they go for more information?  

Russell Stankiewicz, MD: “They can go to BREVAGenPlus.com.”

 

Russell Stankiewicz, MD is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology in The department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Family Medicine at The Commonwealth Medical College in Scranton, PA. He is also President and Senior partner at OB/GYN Associates of Lewisburg, P.C. Dr. Stankiewicz is board certified in Obstetrics and Gynecology, has advanced certification in Minimally Invasive Surgery, and is a certified Menopause Practitioner. He sits on multiple committees of The North American menopause Society. He is also an FAA designated Aviation Medical Examiner.

 

 

 

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